Wednesday, September 20, 2017

22 September 2017: The role of big data to evaluate Aadhaar

Ronald Abraham and Elizabeth Bennett
IDinsight

Organised by:
International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Chair:
Emmanuel Jimenez, International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Discussant:
Ajay Shah, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy (NIPFP),

Abstract:
Aadhaar has become a seemingly ubiquitous component of a wide range of government and private sector services. However, there are significant gaps in our understanding of Aadhaar’s coverage and performance—especially when it comes to understanding the full range of impacts of the identity system.

In this seminar, IDinsight’s Ronald Abraham and Elizabeth Bennett will present excerpts from their State of Aadhaar Report 2016-17, which provides an overview of the Aadhaar landscape and highlights areas for future research. The conversation will then pivot to the role of primary research and big data in evaluating Aadhaar.

IDinsight’s State of Aadhaar initiative aims to catalyse discourse and inform decision-making in the Aadhaar ecosystem. To achieve this objective, the State of Aadhaar website provides up-to-date data, research, news, and official documentation on Aadhaar.

Date: September 22, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Hall 3,
Kamala Devi Complex,
India International Centre,
New Delhi – 110001 (India)

Location:

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

20 September 2017: Discussion on The Future of Global Health: Challenges and Opportunities

Michael Merson
Duke University

Organised by:
The American Center and Duke University

Date: September 20, 2017
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
The American Center
24, Kasturba Gandhi Marg
New Delhi 110 001 (India)

Location:


Note:
Please register here

21 September 2017: Identifying Earnings Management in Indian companies

Deep Narayan Mukherjee
Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta

Discussant:
Amey Sapre, NIPFP

Abstract:
Study on earnings management of Indian companies may not be frequent, but there are quite a few substantial works on this topic. Most of them come to the conclusion that the problem of earnings management is quite rampant. However, earnings management related studies and their results are not "mainstream" among investors or regulators. That is despite the observation that in cases of big ticket NPA, banks often request for a forensic analysis of the defaulter's financial statement. In an effort to enable identification of companies with potential accounting issues, and thus requiring further in depth analysis of those companies, our team has developed a score. The premise of the work being that earnings management is the start of financial manipulations. The team has made certain analytical enhancements to address shortcomings of existing approaches of accounting pertinent to growth economies such as India.

Date: September 21, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

7 September 2017: Mutual Fund Flows and Funds Strategic Behavior When Investors Are Inattentive

Apoorva Javadekar
CAFRAL

Abstract:
The paper builds on a simple yet novel idea that the way investors react to the recent mutual fund performance depends largely upon the long-term historical performance of that fund. In particular, I find that investors react more actively to the funds recent performance in case of the funds with good performance history. I show that these effects are strongest for funds which are likely to attract attentive investors such as funds having more visibility or funds with high entry loads. Next, I show that investors who are less responsive to the fund performance are also less responsive to the changes in fund fees which suggest that \textit{investor inattention} rather than any other rational decision-making process that explains the sluggish capital flows. I build a model which shows how the concentration of attentive investors within fund rise with the historical performance which feeds into more reactive capital flows. I provide evidence that mutual funds are aware of the varying degree of investor responsiveness and they adjust their pricing and portfolio risk to maximize the revenue.

Date: September 7, 2017
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room No. 2
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Thursday, August 31, 2017

8 September 2017: Whatever it takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy

Viral Acharya
Deputy Governor, Reserve Bank of India.

Abstract:
Launched in Summer 2012, the European Central Bank (ECB)’s Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) program indirectly recapitalized European banks through its positive impact on periphery sovereign bonds. However, the stability re-established in the banking sector did not fully translate into economic growth. We document zombie lending by banks that remained undercapitalized even post-OMT. In turn, firms receiving loans used these funds not to undertake real economic activity such as employment and investment but to build up cash reserves. Creditworthy firms in industries with a high zombie firm prevalence suffered significantly from this credit misallocation, which further slowed down the economic recovery.

Date: September 8, 2017
Time: 06:00 P.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Auditorium
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP to dgupta@brookingsindia.org

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

6 September 2017: The impact of the GST on Indian investment

Gaurav S. Ghosh
Ernst & Young

Abstract:
The GST is the most far-reaching restructuring of the Indian tax regime since independence. Its impacts will ramify through all sectors of the Indian economy, from investment through production and consumption. We focus specifically on the impact of the GST on incentives to invest in India. To do this, we measure the tax cost of investment in the pre-GST and post-GST environments, and compare these costs across sectors and at the all-India level. Our metric for the tax cost of investment is the Marginal Effective Tax Rate (“METR”), a statistic measuring the tax wedge imposed upon a marginal investment, where the tax wedge is defined as the difference between the gross-of-tax return on capital and the net-of-tax return on capital for a marginal firm. The use of METRs to evaluate tax systems has a long history in many countries, but ours is its first implementation for the Indian economy. We find that the GST improves investment incentives by moderately reducing the tax burden. Further improvements can be made by streamlining the GST system, primarily by unblocking input tax credits in core sectors of the Indian economy. We also find that METRs vary significantly across Indian industries, and that the impact of the GST on investment incentives in these sectors is also heterogeneous.

Date: September 6, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

1 September 2017: The Cost of Distance: Geography and Governance in Rural India

Karan Nagpal
University of Oxford

Abstract:
Rural economic outcomes deteriorate with distance from cities and towns. We use a spatial regression discontinuity design to provide causal evidence for one channel through which this effect operates: the geography of public administration. Using a rich spatial dataset on Indian villages and their local administrative capitals, we show that a greater distance from capitals reduces the provision of public goods. More distant villages also have lower literacy rates and reduced participation in non-farm activities. To estimate these effects causally, we exploit administrative boundaries that generate sharp jumps in distance to local administration capitals, but not in conventional measures of market access such as distance to towns and highways and population density. We discuss a number of mechanisms that explain these results, including monitoring and provision costs, information asymmetries and citizen voice.

Date: September 1, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

11 August 2017: Immigration and its Discontents: International Migration after Brexit, Brussels, and Trump

Neeraj Kaushal
Columbia University

Abstract:
Immigration has become a hot button issue. From Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, and Germany to Singapore, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States, it is churning electoral politics. A hundred years ago, similar discontents resulted in severe restrictions on immigration. Will history repeat itself? Neeraj Kaushal will discuss the primary drivers these discontents, whether and how these discontents are related to immigration, and how they would shape the future of international migration.

Organised by:
Brookings India

Date: August 11, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Auditorium
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP to sgupta@brookingsindia.org

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

28 July 2017: America's Economic Anxiety

Jonathan Morduch
NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

Discussant:
Shamika Ravi, Brookings India & Brookings Institution

Abstract:
The traditional narrative about financial success in America is that hard work, steady saving, and a little bit of luck will ensure financial security, a comfortable retirement, and a better future for one’s children. But, as the 2016 elections demonstrated, large numbers of Americans feel that the “American Dream” is increasingly out of reach. Their insecurity is so pronounced that when asked by Pew Charitable Trusts if they would rather be a little richer or have a more stable financial life, 92 percent of Americans chose stability. In The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty, Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider explain why this is happening – and what needs to change – based on the results of their ground- breaking study, the U.S. Financial Diaries (USFD). Further details about the book can be found here.

Organised by:
Brookings India

Date: July 28, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Auditorium
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP to sgupta@brookingsindia.org

Monday, July 17, 2017

21 July 2017: Launch: Brookings India Health Monitor and panel discussion

Event Agenda:
Introductory remarks: Dr. Harsha Vardhana Singh, Brookings India
Presentation: Dr. Shamika Ravi, Brookings India
Keynote Address: Shri. CK. Mishra, Secretary MoHFW, Government of India

Panel Discussion: Better Health Data for Better Health Policy
Dr. Soumya Swaminathan (DG, ICMR & Secretary, Health Research, Govt of India)
Mr. Alok Kumar (Advisor - Health and Nutrition, NITI Aayog, Govt of India)
Dr. Naresh Trehan (Chairman and MD, Medanta)
Mr. Swaminathan Aiyar (Prominent Indian Journalist)

Moderator:
Dr. Shamika Ravi, Brookings India

Abstract:
The Brookings India Health Monitor brings together real time data, research and powerful analytics of India’s healthcare sector on a common platform. This is created using publicly available data from across all states and Union Territories of India. It enables policy makers, corporates and researchers to access, monitor and analyse real time health measures at a highly disaggregated district level. We have developed health indexes at state and district levels for Quality and Quantity of health infrastructure which will be updated on a real time basis. We also propose to develop indexes for Maternal health, Child health, Communicable Diseases and Non-communicable Diseases for all states of India.

Our aim is to democratize health data by making it publicly available through easy-to-understand, real time indexes at highly disaggregated level (district of India). We believe that having access to this information can be helpful for local level policy makers as well as to the health industry for core business or corporate social responsibility (CSR). Our informatics is already being used by the NITI Aayog and the Uttar Pradesh health ministry.

Organised by:
Brookings India

Date: July 21, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP sgupta@brookingsindia.org, to reserve seat for you.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

25 July 2017: The Risk Premium on Balance Sheet Capacity

Anusar Farooqui
Indian Institute of Management, Udaipur

Abstract:
We show that exposure to shocks to the balance sheet capacity of US securities broker-dealers carries a significant risk premium. We construct a novel measure of dealer risk appetite and show that it is priced in the cross-section of expected stock excess returns; even after controlling for benchmark risk factors (MKT, SMB, HML, RMW, CMA, MOM and VOL). We document that risk appetite, median book-to-market ratio, the term spread and the difference in market and average excess returns are, independently and jointly, statistically significant predictors of future market excess returns. Armed with these four return-forecasting factors, we estimate dynamic pricing models with constant betas and time-varying prices of risk. We document significant time-variation in the intermediary risk premium and show that it has a natural macro-financial interpretation. In particular, we show that, unlike the premiums on benchmark factors, it is highly procyclical and gets extraordinarily compressed during periods of stock market exuberance such as that of the late-1990s. We find significant macroeconomic information embedded in the intermediary risk premium. Specifically, we show that the intermediary risk premium is both a significant contemporaneous correlate and a significant predictor of quarterly innovations in the US growth rate. We further show that the time-varying intermediary risk premium dwarfs the premiums on benchmark factors. Finally, we construct a factor mimicking portfolio for risk appetite and show that it sports a Sharpe ratio at least twice as large as benchmark factor portfolios.

Date: July 25, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room (First Floor) 
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

Location:

21 July 2017: State of the police forces: Some insights on expenditure, personnel, infrastructure, and accountability

Mandira Kala and Anviti Chaturvedi
PRS Legislative Research

Abstract:
Policing and law order issues come primarily under the states. However, the centre also maintains its police forces to provide states with assistance for matters that have wider internal security implications. This talk will address expenditure on police, and compare spending by various states and centre. It will provide an overview of how police is organised, and discuss issues faced by the police personnel. This will include an analysis of vacancies across centre and states, working conditions of police, and issues with crime investigation. We will also discuss findings of CAG audits and Bureau of Police Research and Development, with regard to availability of weaponry, vehicles, communication equipment, and funds for infrastructure modernisation. Lastly, the session will analyse the efforts being made by states to set up institutions for police accountability, and institution to protect police from political interference, in light of directions of the Supreme Court.

Date: July 21, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Monday, July 10, 2017

18 July 2017: Emerging infectious diseases in a city: dengue and chikungunya in Delhi

Olivier Telle
Centre for Policy Research (CPR)

Abstract:
This presentation will focus on the dengue and chikungunya viruses, which are two of the most common vector borne diseases affecting urban areas around the world. In India and Delhi, these two viruses are spreading rapidly, infecting lakhs of individuals every year. The aim of this study is to underline 1) the geography of these diseases over several years in Delhi 2) the factors that lead to continuous spread within endemic cities –from urban complexity to political organization of urban/epidemic responses. After presenting some short term solutions that can help in controlling disease diffusion, this presentation will be an opportunity to re-evaluate the links between evolution of cities, intra-urban environmental disparities and the issue of sanitation within urban areas.

Date: July 18, 2017
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

28 July 2017: Behavioural insights for policy interventions: exploring the how and why?

Bhuvanesh Awasthi
Epistemic Consultants and Neuroscience Outreach

Abstract:
Human perception, emotion and decision making underlies all policy-making and implementation. In recent years, several organizations across the globe, such as the World bank, the European Commission, the OECD, governments in Australia, the UK, The Netherlands, Germany, France, Denmark, and the USA, are increasingly incorporating behavioural sciences in policy-making.

With the overarching goal of guiding the policy design, implementation and re-assessments that achieve their objectives at minimum cost, cognitive and behavioural insights has been crucial in legislation, regulatory and consumer protection interventions. In the proposed session, with examples from several countries, we shall explore the role of behavioural interventions in reshaping public policy in a wide range of domains, in particular employment, consumer protection, health and taxation.

Date: July 28, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

25 July 2017: Cognitive and neural foundations of human decision making: implications for policy

Bhuvanesh Awasthi
Epistemic Consultants and Neuroscience Outreach

Abstract:
How do humans make choices? What are the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying risky decision making? What can public policy and administration learn from research on neuroscience of cognition and behaviour? Here, we shall explore insights from cognitive science of social perception, social conformity, empathy training and ethical behaviour with implications for public policy.

Date: July 25, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

12 July 2017: 2017 India Policy Forum Lecture - "Avoiding the morning-after blues: Building state capability while times are good"

Lant Pritchett
Harvard Kennedy School

Date: July 12, 2017
Time: 06:30 P.M.

Venue:
The Royal Ballroom,
Imperial Hotel
Janpath Lane, Connaught Place,
New Delhi-110 001(India)

Location:


Note:
RSVP: Ms Sudesh Bala at sbala@ncaer.org or on +91-11-2345-2722.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

14 July 2017: Book launch for "Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development, and the Costs of Caste"

Diane Coffey
and
Dean Spears
Research Institute for Compassionate Economics (RICE)

Abstract:
Where India Goes is a new book about an old problem. The majority of rural Indians do not use a toilet or latrine. Open defecation kills thousands of children in India each year, stunts the physical and cognitive development of those who survive, and has consequences for everyone in India. With the launch of the Swachh Bharat Mission in 2014, sanitation is not merely a human development emergency -- it is now also a policy priority. Yet, the history of sanitation policy proves that latrine construction is not enough to address the reasons why rural Indians reject the kind of affordable latrines provided by the government, and which have greatly reduced open defecation in other countries. Where India Goes challenges us to consider how health and human development can be advanced while social inequality remains so profound.

Date: July 14, 2017
Time: 07:20 P.M.

Venue:
Juniper Room,
India Habitat Centre,
Lodi Road,
New Delhi – 110 003(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
For details: Please contact Ms. Sangita Vyas at sangita@riceinstitute.org

14 July 2017: Place-based Preferential Tax Policy and its Spatial Effects: Evidence from India’s Program on Industrially Backward Districts

Yi Jiang and Rana Hasan
Asian Development Bank

Abstract:
Indian government initiated a program in 1994 to promote manufacturing in districts designated “backwards”. The way the backwards districts were identified enables us to employ a regression discontinuity design to evaluate the impacts of the program. We find that the program’s 5-year tax exemption to manufacturers led to a significant increase in firm entry and employment in relatively better-off backward districts, particularly in light manufacturing industries. However, the program also resulted in negative spillover effects on districts which were neighbouring these backward districts and relatively weaker in economic activity. The findings emphasise that the spatial effects of place-based policies deserve greater attention from policy makers.

Date: July 14, 2017
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
RSVP at partha@cprindia.org

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

5 July 2017: Dinner conversation and Q&A with Rob Sherman

Rob Sherman
Facebook

Moderator:
Arun Sukumar, Observer Research Foundation 

Abstract:
The conversation will highlight global trends in privacy and data protection regimes, and the role of companies like Facebook in contributing – both through its platforms as well as policy interventions – to these trends. Facebook has over 184 million monthly users in India with 95% accessing the website through their mobile phones. WhatsApp has more than 200 million users in India, making the country its largest market in the world. Facebook will be a crucial interlocutor as India’s digital economy grows rapidly over the next few years -- with the growth in connectivity, the rolling out of public hotspots by Facebook across the country, and the government’s push for adoption of digital payments, privacy and data protection will need special attention. With Facebook and other online service providers expanding its user base and services in India, privacy and security features of their platforms will assume centre stage and even influence its future growth in the Indian market.

Date: July 5, 2017
Time: 07:00 P.M.

Venue:
Villa Medici
Taj Mahal Hotel,
1, Mansingh Road,
New Delhi-110 011(India)

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP to madhulika.srikumar@orfonline.org to reserve a seat for you.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Cancelled due to unforeseen reasons: 6 July 2017: Elements of Effective Macroprudential Policy: Lessons from International Experience

Dong He
International Monetary Fund

Abstract:
Experience with macroprudential policy is growing. A large number of countries have put in place dedicated institutional arrangements. Progress is being made also with the design and implementation of macroprudential tools, and an increasing body of empirical research is available that evaluates the effectiveness of macroprudential policy. Responding to a G20 mandate, a recent joint IMF-FSB-BIS paper takes stock of the experiences gained so far regarding elements and practices that can be useful for effective macroprudential policy making. The seminar will introduce the paper, covering institutional arrangements, including mandates and governance, powers, and arrangements for domestic cooperation, and review operational considerations, such as the selection of policy tools and how they are employed. It will also touch upon issues related to international consistency of macroprudential policy.

Date: July 6, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Monday, June 19, 2017

6 July 2017: Elements of Effective Macroprudential Policy: Lessons from International Experience

Dong He
International Monetary Fund

Abstract:
Experience with macroprudential policy is growing. A large number of countries have put in place dedicated institutional arrangements. Progress is being made also with the design and implementation of macroprudential tools, and an increasing body of empirical research is available that evaluates the effectiveness of macroprudential policy. Responding to a G20 mandate, a recent joint IMF-FSB-BIS paper takes stock of the experiences gained so far regarding elements and practices that can be useful for effective macroprudential policy making. The seminar will introduce the paper, covering institutional arrangements, including mandates and governance, powers, and arrangements for domestic cooperation, and review operational considerations, such as the selection of policy tools and how they are employed. It will also touch upon issues related to international consistency of macroprudential policy.

Date: July 6, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

22 June 2017: Mapping Land Conflicts in India


Kumar Sambhav Shrivastava, Ankur Paliwal, and Bhasker Tripathy

Abstract:
India’s ambitious agenda for industrial and infrastructure growth requires large swathes of land. At the same time, a huge part of its population uses land to earn livelihood. The competing demands cause conflicts. The battles over land are increasing across India irrespective of political cultures, be it left, right or centre. These conflicts have deep implications for the wellbeing of India's people, institutions, investments, and long-term development. They point towards deep structural flaws in the country's social, agrarian, and institutional structures, including ambiguities in property rights regimes and institutions.

An analysis of 331 ongoing land conflicts in India reveals that together they affect close to 36 lakhs people and span over 10 lakhs hectares of land. The total investments (indicative) tied to these conflicts are around Rs.12 lakhs crore. The data was collected between January 2016 and March 2017 by Land Conflict Watch, a research-based data journalism project that maps land conflicts across India. In this presentation, we address how, why, and where these conflicts are emerging and what are the implications of these conflicts for local communities and investment policies in India. We find that in contrast to accepted wisdom, the majority of land conflicts in India are revolving around common lands rather than private lands. We argue that in order to sustain and expand India's socioeconomic development, it is imperative that the government respect communities' land rights, including Forest Rights Act 2006 and ensure that their formal as well as customary jurisdiction over commons is recognised and respected.

Date: June 22, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSel5phH02g_Gdbtqg2DmmmqJesdSInlOAzCjdSOuFn2yMwuIg/viewform?c=0&w=1

Thursday, June 15, 2017

27 June 2017: Presentation of India Development Update: May 2017 Unlocking Women's Potential

Presenter:
Frederico Gil Sander
World Bank

Chair Person:
Rathin Roy, Director, NIPFP

Discussants:
N R Bhanumurthy, Professor, NIPFP and
Sher Singh Verick, Deputy Director, ILO Decent Work Team for South Asia and Country Office for India

Abstract:
The India Development Update is the World Bank’s twice-yearly report on the Indian economy and its prospects. This edition has topical notes on the demonetization experiment (did it curb black money?), an analysis of recent fiscal policy developments (should we be worried about states’ borrowing?), and an update on trade policy and performance (is the talk of protectionism being translated into action?)

Each edition also includes timely thematic notes, and a focus chapter on an issue of structural importance for India’s long-term development. The theme of the May 2017 India Development Update is “Unlocking Women’s Talent”. India has one of the lowest female participation rates in the world, ranking 120th among the 131 countries for which data are available. Worse still, the rate has been declining since 2005, and even among highly educated women (those with a diploma or university degree) only 1/3 are in the labor market. The shallower talent pool – including managerial and entrepreneurial talent – comes at a cost to economic growth. Why are so few women in the labor market, and what can be done about it?

Date: June 27, 2013
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
NIPFP Auditorium, Ground Floor
Main Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
For details: Please contact nrbmurthy@gmail.com

Thursday, June 8, 2017

13 June 2017: What is the "state" of India's public finances?

Sajjid Chinoy
J.P. Morgan

Abstract:
After becoming the epitome of fiscal discipline in the mid-2000s, India’s state finances have markedly worsened in recent years and risks have increased going forward. What has driven the deterioration? How pervasive is it? More importantly what are the implications? While there has been much analysis of how worsening state finances impact the consolidated deficit and debt dynamics, we focus on how worsening state finances have caused state bond spreads to spike and show how these higher borrowing costs spill-over onto corporate bond spreads. This, in turn, pushes up borrowing costs for the private sector, and risks crowding out of the corporate bond market, precisely when the banking sector is under stress. We discuss these developments in the larger macroeconomic context at the moment, and suggest policy and market measures to rein in state fiscal deficits.

Date: June 13, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
NIPFP Auditorium, Ground Floor
Main Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Monday, May 15, 2017

17 May 2017: Talk on 'The Future We Need: Natural Resources as a Shared Inheritance'

Rahul Basu
Goa Foundation, Goenchi Mati Movement (GMM), and The Future We Need (TFWN)

Abstract:
Natural resources include our environment, minerals, and land. From an economic standpoint, land and minerals are the most valuable. Wealth attracts thieves, adventurers, rent seekers and crony capitalists. It is not surprising that mining encourages corruption, as private parties attempt to capture most of the value through "legal" but fundamentally illegitimate contracts. This in turn drives environment and human rights violations, which give rise to conflict. Iron ore mining in Goa has become a contentious issue between government and civil society. In his talk, Rahul will speak about the work of the Goa Foundation, an environmental NGO, in raising awareness about mining as Goa’s largest environmental issue for over twenty five years. He will describe the Supreme Court's decision in the Goa Mining case, where the Court was concerned with the rapid depletion of iron ore, and wanted a practical method of implementing the principle of "intergenerational equity", earlier ruled by the Court to be a part of the "Right to Life". Goa Foundation uses the "public trust" doctrine and the "intergenerational equity" principle to propose an ethical, fair and just resolution to the issue in the form of the "fair mining" proposal. This proposal has support from the Constitution, our traditions and customs, economics and global best practices. Rahul will explain how the "fair mining" proposal reduces poverty, slows growing inequality, reduces corruption and crony capitalism, improves governance and even creates a palatable 'Universal Basic Income'. As a result of a recommendation from the Goa Foundation, the Supreme Court has ordered the creation of the Goa Iron Ore Permanent Fund. This is intended to be a savings fund akin to the oil funds of Norway and Alaska. The Supreme Court has also ruled the last five years of iron ore mining in Goa to be illegal. While giving rise to enormous claims on the miners (as illegal mining is equivalent to theft of public property), it also gave the Goa government a clean slate. It had full freedom to redesign its mining sector. The Goenchi Mati Movement issued a manifesto for the Goa State Assembly elections showing how these principles could be put into practice. The manifesto was supported by the mining affected, mining dependent, and even a miner. It has also been supported by four political parties including AAP, as well as the Archbishop of Goa, the Shadow Chancellor of the UK, and a broad spectrum of civil society.

Date: May 17, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Friday, May 12, 2017

16 May 2017: The rule of law, global prosperity and strategic calculation: the stakes for the Indo-Pacific region and the world of China’s rise

Brian Lee Crowley
Macdonald-Laurier Institute, Ottawa, Canada

Chair:
Abhijit Singh, Head, Maritime Policy Initiative, ORF 

Date: May 16, 2016
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
ORF Conference Room
Observer Research Foundation
20 Rouse Avenue Institutional Area
New Delhi-110002(INDIA)

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP to orfevents@orfonline.org

Thursday, May 4, 2017

15 May 2017: Word from the Frontlines of Demonetization: Perspective’s & Lessons Learnt from India’s Largest Cash Management Company

Rajiv Kaul
CMS Info Systems Ltd.

Abstract:
Nov 8th, 2016 will go down in the Indian Economy as a red letter day, when literally overnight the Rs. 500 and Rs.1000 banknotes were demonetised. The first two weeks, and then the prolonged aftermath affected us at an individual, industry, sectoral and economic level. As India’s largest ATM cash management company, handling more than 50% of all ATM cash replenishment, and the largest retail cash collection service, with a presence across 95% of all the districts in India, CMS was at the frontline of managing this exercise in evacuation, recalibration and replenishment of ATMs. This presentation delves into the company's singular experience in handling and surviving Demonetisation, leadership lessons in coping with an increasingly chaotic ecosystem, while giving some insights into the cash cycle of our country, how the multiple entities that affect it moved in cohesion or otherwise.

Date: May 15, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

5 May 2017: The Business of Religion and Caste in India

Manaswini Bhalla
IIM Bangalore

Abstract:
We show that boards of directors of large Indian firms are characterized by high levels of cultural proximity, with members on a board belonging overwhelmingly to the same religion or caste. Using a unique database of self-reported religions and caste from matrimonial websites, we develop a novel methodology to proba- bilistically map individuals last names to religions and castes. We also develop a new homophily index to measure cultural proximity of board members. Results show few signs of increase in cultural diversity on boards during 1999-2012. Modest heterogeneity exists across firms, sectors, and states, however. Better performing firms have more diverse boards. Board diversity also increased in sectors and states that witnessed the largest increases in output. Rigorous instrument variable analysis demonstrates that lack of diversity on boards is causally associated with lower firm performance.

Date: May 5, 2017
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Class Room No. 14
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

18 May 2017: Minerals as a shared inheritance: Implications for public finance

Rahul Basu
Goa Foundation, Goenchi Mati Movement (GMM), and The Future We Need (TFWN)

Abstract:
Mining drives corruption, mis-governance, crony capitalism, environment & human rights damage and conflict. Iron ore mining in Goa has become contentious between civil society and the government. The Goenchi Mati Movement uses the Public Trust Doctrine and the Intergenerational Equity Principle to propose a ethical, fair & just resolution to the issue. The ramifications of the proposal are far reaching, including many aspects of public finance, capital markets and national income statistics.

Date: May 18, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

28 April 2017: Corruption in the Supreme Court of India

Madhav S Aney
Singapore Management University

Abstract:
We investigate whether judicial decisions are affected by career concerns of judges by analysing two questions: Do judges respond to pandering incentives by ruling in favour of the government in the hope of receiving jobs after retiring from the Court? Does the government actually reward judges who ruled in its favour with prestigious jobs? To answer these questions we construct a dataset of all Supreme Court of India cases involving the government from 1999 till 2014, with an indicator for whether the decision was in its favour or not. We find that pandering incentives have a causal effect on judicial decision-making. The exposure of a judge to pandering incentives in a case is jointly determined by 1) whether the case is salient (exogenously determined by a system of random allocation of cases) and 2) whether the judge retires with enough time left in a governments term to be rewarded with a prestigious job (date of retirement is exogenously determined by law to be their 65th birthday). We find that pandering occurs through through the more active channel of writing favourable judgements rather than passively being on a bench that decides a case in favour of the government. Furthermore, we find that deciding in favour of the government is positively associated with both the likelihood and the speed with which judges are appointed to prestigious post-Supreme Court jobs. These findings suggest the presence of corruption in the form government influence over judicial decision-making that seriously undermines judicial independence.

Date: April 28, 2017
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Class Room No. 14
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Monday, April 10, 2017

10 April 2017: Is Dollar Hegemony Inevitable? Possibilities for Reform in the Global Reserve System

Anush Kapadia
Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay.

Abstract:
The global reserve system is dominated by a single currency, the US dollar, in which the vast bulk of global trade and finance is conducted. This currency hegemony gives the world's only superpower the exorbitant privilege of having its own liabilities function as the global currency. Several scholars argue that the scale of this privilege help seed the financial crisis of 2007. Emerging markets poured their savings into dollar-denominated debt, creating a flood of cheap credit that lead to wild speculation and subsequent collapse. Since the crisis, several reform measures for this destabilising global reserve system have been suggested, with speculation on everything from a return to the gold standard, an elevation of the IMF's Special Drawing Right (SDR), and the rise of the Chinese Renminbi being discussed. This lecture offers a systemic account of how the global reserve system works in order to evaluate these claims. It argues that that global currencies will continue to be nationally based, hence reforms will have to focus on international institutions capable of disciplining the (existing and/or rising) hegemon rather than creating new synthetic currencies like the SDR.

Date: April 10, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Monday, April 3, 2017

20 April 2017: Money & Medicine – the odd couple: An overview of the complexities of health system financing

Margaret Faux
Synapse Medical Services

Abstract:
With a hundred years of health systems behind us we know a great deal about what works and what doesn’t work in the health market. Countries such as India are perfectly positioned to benefit from this vast body of knowledge, but it’s complex! In this seminar we will consider key questions such as who should pay for health? Why is the health market unique and why are countries with very different health systems, facing the same challenges controlling health expenditure? What is universal healthcare and why is the USA the only developed country that has been unable to achieve it? We will look at important health system drivers including information asymmetry, the operation of the moral hazard, the social determinants of health, the codification of health services and the ways in which doctors around the world are paid. We will also compare and contrast some successful but very different health care systems, before concluding by considering the core legal infrastructure required for a health system to succeed.

Date: April 20, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

3 April 2017: Prenatal sex selection and its future

Christophe Z Guilmoto
French Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), CEPED, Paris

Abstract:
This presentation contextualises India’s prenatal sex selection within a larger framework of countries with a history of similar processes. India's story with its skewed sex ratio at birth is well-known, even if its dynamics are still poorly understood. This presentation will briefly discuss the process of demographic masculinization from the 1980s, and examine the few demographic, social, and economic invariants found across countries affected by the rise in sex selective abortions. The present will focus on spatial patterns, one of the most distinct determinants of observed variations in sex ratio and conclude by considering how the known factors behind gender bias can help decipher the future of skewed sex ratios.

Date: April 3, 2017
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Wednesday, March 29, 2017

5 April 2017: Regulatory framework for IFSC in India: The experience of GIFT IFSC

Dipesh Shah
Gujarat International Finance Tec-City Co. Ltd. (GIFT)

Abstract:
International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) is considered as a game changer for providing International Financial Services from Global Financial Centre in India. In the absence of IFSC in India, it is estimated that India is losing around US $ 50 billion per year (2015) which will grow to US $ 120 billion by 2025.

Govt. of India announced regulatory frame work for IFSC in India on April 10, 2015. In a short span of two years, GIFT International Financial Services Centre has attracted International Financial Services with 9 Banks, 4 Insurance Companies, 2 leading Exchanges and around 100 broking entities. The banking vertical have already completed around USD 2 billion transactions from GIFT IFSC. International Exchange for the first time in the country started trading of foreign stock futures covering Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and JP Morgan. The experience of GIFT IFSC in this regard is useful learning for the development of International Financial Services Centre in India.

Date: April 5, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

27-28 March 2017: Workshop on Labour Migration and Social Change in South Asia

Organised by:
Centre for Policy Research (CPR) and
French Centre for Social Sciences and Humanities (CSH) supported by Tata Trusts’ SHRAMIC initiative

Program

Abstract:
Though the movement of people in pursuit of work is not new, labour migration appears to be a growing phenomenon in the South Asian region. Empirical studies and papers analysing government data have shown that migration is not a simple movement from village to city in this region, but involves multiple streams and patterns including short-term, iterative, permanent and return migration across short and long distances. This workshop explores aspects that link human mobility and social transformation in sending and receiving communities, especially in the context of labour migration.

This workshop has been conceived as a platform for young researchers, scholars and practitioners to share their work and receive feedback from experienced and knowledgeable experts. The 15-odd papers being presented have been selected from over 70 entries in response to a call for papers in December 2016 and represent the work of young researchers across the South Asia region.

Date: March 27-28, 2017
Time: 09:30 A.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall,
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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Monday, March 20, 2017

24 March 2017: Using Technology to Strengthen Democracy

Shamika Ravi
Brookings India

Discussant:
S.Y. Quraishi, former Chief Election Commission, India

Abstract:
Free and fair elections are cornerstones of democracy. In India, electronic voting machines (EVMs) were introduced with the objective of reducing electoral fraud. We exploit the phased roll-out of the EVMs in state assembly elections to study its impact on electoral fraud, democracy, and development. Our main findings are: (i) Introductions of EVMs led to a significant decline in electoral frauds, particularly in politically sensitive states which were subjected to frequent re-polls due to electoral rigging. (ii) It strengthened the weaker and the vulnerable sections of the society (women and the scheduled castes and tribe) who were now more likely to cast their vote. (iii) It made the electoral process more competitive whereby the winning margin and the vote share of the winning party declined. (iv) Using the luminosity data, we find that EVMs led to an increase in the provision of electricity. (v) Lastly, we find evidence that EVMs resulted in significant decline in crimes, such as murder and rape (violence against women). Complete paper can be found here: http://brook.gs/2mF63el. This paper is co-authored with Dr. Sisir Debnath (ISB) and Dr. Mudit Kapoor (ISI).

Organised by:
Brookings India

Date: March 24, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Conference Room,
Brookings India
Second Floor,
6, Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location:


Note:
Please RSVP shamika.ravi@brookingsindia.org to reserve a seat for you.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

13 April 2017: Enhancing Energy Efficiency in Urban India

Ajay Mathur
The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)

Moderator: Isher Judge Ahluwalia, ICRIER

Date: April 13, 2017
Time: 07:00 P.M.

Venue:
Gulmohar Hall,
India Habitat Centre,
Lodi Road,
New Delhi 110003(India)

Location:

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Tuesday, March 14, 2017

27 March 2017: Three Forces Converging on Financial Services

Tiff Macklem
Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Chair: Jaimini Bhagwati, ICRIER

Abstract:
Over the last 10 years, three forces have converged on the financial services industry: regulatory change, culture and disruption. In response to the 2008 financial crisis, the Financial Stability Board under the direction of the G20 introduced sweeping regulatory changes that have had far-reaching impacts. But rules and regulations are only effective for what we can measure – for everything else there is culture. In the wake of a series of scandals and large regulatory fines, banks and the regulators have become increasingly attuned to the importance of culture. Finally while global banks have focused on implementing regulatory changes and course correcting their culture, thousands of new FinTech companies, as well as large technology companies, have opened a new competitive frontier in financial services.

Tiff Macklem, will speak to these three issues. Dean Macklem will conclude with some speculative comments on how the Trump presidency may influence these trends.

Date: March 27, 2017
Time: 10:30 A.M.

Venue:
ICRIER Conference Room,
Core 6A, 4th Floor,
India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road,
New Delhi – 110 003(INDIA)

Location:

Thursday, March 9, 2017

10 March 2017: Talk on "Intellectual Migration: skilled Indian migration to/from the US, preliminary findings"

Wei Li
Arizona State University

Abstract:
Based on a new conceptual framework of intellectual migration , this talk presents some preliminary findings of the author’s Fulbright-Nehru Flex Award project. It will include initial results of an online survey among India college students’ intention to study abroad and possible return to India, and their assessment of India and the U.S.; and the reasoning and experiences of Indian returnees with US degrees to/from the U.S. Collaborating with Indian host/research assistants, this project is an integral part of a larger project to examine a spectrum of Chinese and Indian highly-skilled migration (pre-migration domestic students, migrating students/professionals, and return/onward migrants) in transnational connections and brain circulation.

Date: March 10, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
American Center,
24, Kasturba Gandhi Marg,
New Delhi - 110001(INDIA)

Location:

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

7 March 2017: Financing Micro and Small firms during the Great Recession

Megha Patnaik
Stanford University

Abstract:
I examine the role of bank lending frictions and the housing-collateral lending channel for small business credit in the US during the Great Recession. I use a new dataset from a leading online accounting software with millions of financial transactions, links to banks, and owner and firm addresses for small businesses. Using the failure of banks and movements in house prices in the business owners home ZIP code during this period as shocks to credit supply, I find that bank failures are associated with declines in credit for small firms (small businesses with 10 to 250 employees) but not micro firms (those with 2 to 10 employees). In contrast, movements in house prices at the owners location are positively associated with credit for micro firms but not small firms. The results suggest differences within small businesses in the channels used to overcome asymmetric information. Micro firms may depend more on personal housing collateral and small firms on lending relationships, consistent with the associated costs to lenders.

Date: March 7, 2017
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room No. 2
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Thursday, March 2, 2017

16 March 2017: Zero Rating of Content: The Power in the Middle

D. Manjunath
Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay

Abstract:
Zero rating platforms allow a content provider to pay the ISP for the consumption of its data by a user; the user gets to consume for free. This is differential pricing and hence violates neutrality. We analyze the market structures that can emerge when zero rating is permitted.

Date: March 16, 2017
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

10 March 2017: Discussion on Contemporary Issues in the Electricity Sector – twenty-five years of reforms

Organised by:
Prayas (Energy Group)

Abstract:
Many Sparks but Little Light: The Rhetoric and Practice of Electricity Sector Reforms in India
Since 1991, several reforms have been attempted in the electricity sector — indeed, the entire energy sector. Over this period, PEG has keenly followed and participated in the reforms process as a proactive, independent organisation offering constructive critique and suggestions to further public interest. Based on this unique engagement and understanding of the sector, PEG has authored this book, which critically examines many of these reforms and the impacts they have had, to understand if they achieved their expected objectives and if they helped in achieving the desirable socio-environmental outcomes. The in-depth analysis over eight chapters covers thermal, hydropower and renewable generation, electricity distribution, and associated fuel sectors of coal and natural gas.

Date: March 10, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Magnolia Hall,
India Habitat Centre
Lodi Road,
New Delhi – 110 003(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Kindly confirm your participation at pegadmin@prayaspune.org.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

8 March 2017: A longitudinal analysis of internal migration, divorce and well-being in China

Alok Bhargava
University of Maryland, United States

Chair: Ali Mehdi

Abstract:
The rapid economic growth in China has been accompanied by increases in levels of internal migration and marital dissolution. The problems are compounded by preference for sons and one-child policy. In light of this, Dr Bhargava would present his analysis of internal migration, divorce and well-being in China. Using longitudinal data from China Health and Nutrition Surveys covering over 19,000 individuals during 1989-2011, his paper has modeled the inter-relationships between internal migration, divorce and individual well-being, tackling methodological aspects such as joint determination of variables. The seminar would also elaborate on the key findings of the analysis. First, random effects probit models showed that migration periods significantly increased the chances of divorce. Second, having sons implied more stable marriages for men reflecting a son-preference. Third, results from dynamic random effects models for self-reported health showed different effects of separation periods for men and women; divorce did not significantly lower the health status. Fourth, dynamic models for systolic and diastolic blood pressures showed significant effects of Body Mass Index and alcohol intake. Further, implications of the findings for health policies will be discussed.

Date: March 8, 2017
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
ICRIER Conference Room,
Core 6A, 4th Floor,
India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road,
New Delhi – 110 003(INDIA)

Location:

Monday, February 27, 2017

8 March 2017: Discussion on Navigating the Labyrinth: Perspectives on India’s Higher Education

Moderator:
Anubha Bhonsle

Discussants:
Pankaj Chandra, Ahmedabad University
Apoorvanand Jha, University of Delhi
Devesh Kapur, University of Pennsylvania and
Pratap Bhanu Mehta, Centre for Policy Research

Abstract:
In India, few things open faster than colleges, but few sectors reform more slowly than higher education. Demographic changes, economic growth and integration into the global economy, the rising demand for higher education, and the increase in the number of private colleges have led to a massive expansion in Indian higher education. While challenges of access and cost have been long-standing, much of this expansion has been of dubious quality, the result of sustained and deep regulatory and governance failures.

This book analyses these and other complex challenges facing higher education in India, and suggests possible solutions to some of them. The contributors highlight a range of issues facing higher education today, through a deeply moving account of the decline of a college in north Bihar; discussions on the various types of post-secondary educational institutions—the research university, teaching colleges, and vocational training institutes; initiatives, such as community colleges, to address the problem of skill development in India; and the financing and governance of higher education in India.

Date: March 8, 2017
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
Gulmohar Hall,
India Habitat Centre,
Lodi Road,
New Delhi – 110 003(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Please join us for tea at 3:30 p.m. RSVP: Kunal Jalali +91 9015128699

2 March 2017: Does Devolution to Local Governments Improve Health Outcomes in Rural India?

Hari K. Nagarajan
Institute of Rural Management, Anand

Abstract:
Please join us for a conversation with Professor Hari K. Nagarajan, RBI Chair Professor at IRMA, about the findings of his joint work with Hans P. Binswanger-Mkhize and Anirudh Tagat on whether democratisation and devolution of responsibilities to local governments in India improves access to health care, health status, and individual health incomes.

Using nationally representative household panel data for rural India from NCAER’s Rural Economic and Demographic Surveys (more popularly known as REDS), the authors explore the welfare effects of the choice of health service provider. They find that the deepening of democracy through participation in local decision-making and improved grievance redressal related to public goods influences the choice of health care provider. Given a level of illness, they find that such choice, in turn, leads to increases in contribution to household incomes that vary by gender. Their work importantly implies that it is not only the supply of services and mechanisms of access that are important, but what also matters is the extent to which members of households are able to participate in the management and governance of these services. This work continues earlier work based on the REDS data, the only national panel data for rural India, by Nagarajan, Binswanger and Meenakshisundaram in their book, Decentralization and Empowerment for Rural Development, published by NCAER and Cambridge University Press in 2015.

Date: March 2, 2017
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
NCAER Conference Room
National Council of Applied Economic Research
Parisila Bhawan, 11, Indraprastha Estate
New Delhi-110002(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Please join us for high tea and conversation with the author after the seminar. For queries, please contact Ms Sudesh Bala at sbala@ncaer.org or on +91-11-2345-2722.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

2 March 2017: The Transmission of Monetary Policy Within Banks: Evidence from India​

Prachi Mishra
Reserve Bank of India

Date: March 2, 2017
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room (First Floor) 
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

Location:

28 Febraury 2017: Public lands for public needs: How we can optimize returns from a dormant asset for national needs

Shubhashis Gangopadhyay
India Development Foundation (IDF) and Member, Ministry of Defence committee on land utilisation

Discussant:
Sumit Bose, Chairman, Ministry of Defence committee on land utilization

Moderator:
Nalin Mehta, India Development Foundation (IDF)

Abstract:
Reforming management of public lands is crucial for developing smart cities and dealing with the next set of governance challenges for a rapidly urbanising India. Solutions for improving land management lie at the heart of the next phase of the India story. How government can use lands it controls more creatively to create new value and solve development challenges is a key challenge for policymakers. This is essential not just for managing the challenges of urbanization and industrialization but also has huge political and social implications with large numbers of rural workers moving out of farming into big cities as migrants.

This seminar examines how government currently deals with surplus government lands in Indian cities, how this compares with other democracies (such as US, UK, Canada, Australia etc) and suggests optimal solutions for India. It also examines the vexed question of land acquisition and how our processes can be optimized for the greatest economic and social benefit for the country.

Date: February 28, 2017
Time: 11:00 A.M.

Venue:
Viceregal, 2nd Floor,
The Claridges,
12, Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam Road,
New Delhi-110011(INDIA)

Location:


Note:
Please confirm your participation to Iqbal Shariff at ishariff@idfresearch.org to reserve a seat for you.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

28 February 2017: Gender and Public Transport in India: How do we move from women's safety to gender equity?

Sonal Shah
Institute for Transportation and Development Policy

Abstract:
The increased policy attention to gender in public transport in India has focused on women and is largely circumscribed by technological and project level interventions aimed at addressing and preventing gruesome incidents of violence. The accounts of sexual violence in the public sphere and Nirbhaya’s death in December 2012 galvanized action by civil society and different levels of government in creating safer public transportation systems.

However, public transport planning remains gender blind as city mobility plans rarely collect gender disaggregated data, investigate gendered trip chaining patterns, the mobility of care, inequities such as daily harassment, time poverty, forced mobility and forced immobility, lack of access to non-motorized vehicles and employment and growth in public transport organizations.

This is compounded by fragmented information on existing initiatives undertaken by public transportation authorities. For example, bus-based authorities have created toilets for transgender persons at city bus stands (Mysore), installed GPS devices and CCTV cameras, provided segregated seats and women only doors, conducted gender sensitization trainings, created Women Safety Committees (e.g. Bangalore) and reserved jobs for women drivers and conductors (e.g. Karnataka). Some of these were initiated prior to 2012, often on political requests or on receiving complaints. The implementation challenges, impact of these actions or the extent to which gender equity is rooted within the transport organization’s vision and goals has not been explored. Thus a wide area of research themes on gender and mobility in India remain uninvestigated.

This paper situates women’s security within a broader goal of gender equity; and identifies research gaps in moving the policy discourse towards gender equitable public transport systems. The research focuses on city bus services as they form the back bone of urban India’s public transportation system. The research was conducted at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements and was first presented at the conference on “Urban Planning, Governance and Design for Reducing Urban Conflicts and Violence: Critical Learnings and Possibilities”, March 2-4, 2016, Ahmedabad.

Date: February 28, 2017
Time: 03:45 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Location:

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