Thursday, January 17, 2019

21 January 2019: Book launch of "The Land Question in Urban Development"

Edited by:
Shashanka Bhide, Former Director, Madras Institute of Development Studies and Devendra B. Gupta, National Council of Applied Economic Research

Abstract:
India is one of the most land-scarce countries in the world. This scarcity has been increasing at a rapid pace in urban India. The resulting rise in urban land prices has led to the growth of unauthorised settlements, inadequate infrastructure, squalor, and homeless populations. Land regulation is hampered by the absence of systematic data collection and analysis, and by poorly drafted laws and the limited management capacities of urban development agencies. Despite these concerns, urban economics in India has remained a neglected field of policymaking and policy assessment. This edited conference volume contains invited papers from NCAER’s Round Table in New Delhi on Land Economics–Issues and Challenges. The Editors also commissioned several additional papers that the Round Table did not cover. The ten papers cover the full array of problems that confront India’s urban areas. It is a testimony both to the quality of these papers and to the persistence of the problems that the papers remain fully relevant and have much to offer four years after the NCAER Round Table.

Date: January 21, 2019
Time: 01:00 P.M.

Venue:
T2 Conference Centre,
The NCAER India Centre
Parisila Bhawan, 11, Indraprastha Estate
New Delhi-110002(INDIA)

Note:
For queries, please contact Ms Sudesh Bala at sbala@ncaer.org, +91-11-2345-2722

Location:

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Thursday, January 10, 2019

14 January 2019: Improving Monetary Transmission Through the Banking Channel - The Case for External Benchmarks in Bank Loans

Viral Acharya
Reserve Bank of India

Date: January 14, 2019
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Swami Vivekananda Hall
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

Location:

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

15 January 2019: Critique of and Alternatives to the Extractive Imagination of AI

Anupam Guha

Discussant:
Tarunima Prabhakar, Center for Long Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

Abstract:
The imminence of artificial intelligence has been accompanied by a narrative of inevitability in social relations based on premises which have not been critically interrogated. Companies are selling “AI solutions” to problems where neither what constitutes AI nor whether these problems are technological in nature is debated as fiercely as it should, if only to prevent unforeseen consequences. These premises do not question the extractive nature of current social relations and thus imagine AI in the role of accelerant and property and not much else. This lack of political imagination has potentially dire consequences of furthering inequity, baking in precarity, and freezing structural oppression, perhaps even causing regression. Even the critique of AI policy in a sense accepts these premises and focuses on bias and transparency of systems as they are used now, rather than power and ownership, both legitimising solutionism and diverting the blame for what are sociological problems onto technology.

Considering the oppressive and the emancipatory potential of AI systems it becomes our task to critique both the social relations it is premised on and provide an alternative imagination for AI which explores the nature of work and property in the era of automation. My talk will go into (in the Indian context) the limitations of current policy thought when it comes to AI, a critique of band aid measures being presented like UBI and robot taxes, and an exploration of the premises, especially the nature of data as property, current policy is being written on. My talk will then present an alternative imagination for labour in relation to AI, of work, wage, and public prosperity, and thus a framework for what is to be done.

Date: January 15, 2019
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at latha.balasubramanian@nipfp.org.in

Location:

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Thursday, December 13, 2018

14 December 2018: Is Housing an Intractable Problem?

Richard K. Green
USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

Discussant:
Sameer Sharma, DG & CEO, Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs (IICA)

Abstract:
All over the world, in rich countries and poor, housing is a problem. In rich countries it is too expensive, in the absence of subsidy, for those at the bottom of the income distribution. In poor countries, vast numbers lack access to infrastructure that makes housing healthy and accessible: electricity, sewer systems, clean water, and transport. The countries that best house their people—Singapore, Norway, New Zealand and Switzerland—are affluent and have small populations. This talk will look at the strengths and weaknesses of housing policy across a number of countries. It will look at the role of formal property rights, land use regulation, building permit processes, supply and demand side subsidies, and housing finance. It will also discuss value capture as a technique for at once encouraging the construction of new housing while financing the infrastructure necessary to allow dwellers of that housing to be healthy and to have access to employment. While there are policies that do improve housing outcomes, one possibly intractable problem facing successful cities is latent demand. In principle, one could build enough housing to meet demand for any growing city (such as Shanghai or Bangalore), but as a physical, rather than a policy matter, this can be difficult. This implies that very successful cities will need subsidies in order to have the heterogeneous labor force necessary for an economy to thrive. The talk will end by discussing what those subsidies might look like.

Date: December 14, 2018
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Note:
Please RSVP psharma@brookingsindia.org and contact and zkazmi@brookingsindia.org for media inquiries.

Location:

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

20 December 2018: Managing a Water Utility in the United States: Lessons in Operations and Finance

Ravindra M Srivastava
U.S. Embassy, New Delhi

Date: December 20, 2018
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Friday, December 7, 2018

10 December 2018: Talk on Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana: Lessons from India’s Previous Government Health Insurance Programmes

Jeffrey Hammer
National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER)

Abstract:
The newly launched Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PMJAY) has the mandate to deliver health insurance coverage of Rs 5 lakh per family per year to over 10 crore poor and vulnerable Indian families. Under the larger ambit of Ayushmaan Bharat, PMJAY is envisioned to be the world’s largest health insurance programme aimed at increasing access to quality healthcare and reducing the financial burden of catastrophic expenses on poor and vulnerable groups.

This ambitious scheme comes after previous similar efforts for nation-wide health insurance, such as the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), have not yielded desired results. What can we learn from these past efforts? The third session in the Policy In-Depth series will explore some of these implementation challenges, namely - pricing, third party monitoring, regulation and insurance fraud, the current quality of government hospitals, as well as, concerns on the current capacity of the government administrative structure. Underpinning the discussion will be the significant informational requirements necessary to support the programme.

Date: December 10, 2018
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Note:
Kindly click here: https://www.facebook.com/events/601760533579953/ to register or RSVP at ashrivastava@accountabilityindia.org.

Location:

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Thursday, November 29, 2018

3 December 2018: Tiffin Talk - Does beef availability early in life affect anaemia decades later? Evidence from cattle slaughter bans in India

Aparjita Dasgupta,
Ashoka University

Abstract:
This paper uses the rollout of cattle slaughter bans in India as a natural experiment in beef availability around birth. We compile rich historical data on cattle slaughter ban legislation and harmonize it with household and individual level data on beef consumption and biomarkers from independent data sources for this purpose. Using a triple differences-in-difference strategy along with an event study design, we show that cattle slaughter bans reduce the availability of beef for the poor. In the long –term we find that early life exposure to cow slaughter bans leads to lower levels of haemoglobin (Hb)for poor women in communities that traditionally eat beef, who are up to 10% more likely to be anaemic in their prime reproductive ages.

Date: December 3, 2018
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Location: