Tuesday, February 20, 2018

23 February 2018: Panel Discussion on 'Crop Burning as a source of Air Pollution in National Capital Region'

Panellists:
HS Sidhu, Borlaug Institute of South Asia
Pritam Singh Hanjra, Panipat, Haryana
Rajbir Yadav, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI)

Moderator:
Harish Damodaran, Rural Affairs and Agriculture Editor, The Indian Express

Abstract:
We look at crop burning as a source of air pollution in the National Capital Region. By some estimates biomass burning, including seasonal burning of crop residue in Punjab, Haryana and parts of Uttar Pradesh, contributes 20% of the annual average particulate matter in the urban air shed of the region. While banning crop burning appears to be the straightforward solution, and one that has appealed to the courts, it is far from being easily implementable. Without cost effective alternatives to harvest and dispose the crop residue in time to sow for the next season, burning the residue is still the most viable option for many farmers, even if it significantly worsens the local and regional air quality.

The panel will explore the genesis of the problem, why it has become a particularly thorny issue in the last few years, and what are the possible technological interventions available? It will also discuss the key political, scientific, economic and social drivers that have to considered while designing a long-term solutions to the problem of crop burning.

Date: February 23, 2018
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Note:
Please do RSVP at climate.initiative.cpr@gmail.com

Location:

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Friday, February 9, 2018

15 February 2018: Aspiring for the future: Drivers and consequences of women’s aspirations in rural India

Kalyani Raghunathan
International Food Policy Research Institute

Organised by:
Brookings India

Abstract:
Kalyani Raghunathan examines the drivers of the aspirations of rural women around income, asset ownership, social status and the education of their children. Using data from five states in Northern India, she studies what role the average levels of outcomes in geographical and caste-based reference groups have to play in the formation of aspirations. She then investigates how the gaps between current and aspired-to status influence individual investments in financial, social status-related, and educational dimensions.

Date: February 15, 2018
Time: 11:00 A.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Auditorium
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Note:
Please RSVP psharma@brookingsindia.org

Location:

Thursday, February 8, 2018

9 February 2018: Workshop on "New opportunities in controlling vector-borne diseases: Big data, new insecticides and governance in urban India"

Organised by:
Centre for Policy Research (CPR) and The Centre for Social Sciences and Humanities (CSH)

Abstract:
Mosquito-borne diseases rising in Asia is a critical issue: severe dengue is for an example a leading cause of serious illness and death among children in some Asian and Latin American countries. In India, CNRS and CPR collaborate with National Institute of Malaria Research (ICMR), South Municipal Corporation of Delhi and Institut Pasteur on a Public Health project which looks for short and long-term solutions to slow epidemics of vector-borne diseases. This project aims to test on-site innovative tools to control the Aedes Aegipty mosquito - the main vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses and to rely on big data mining to better locate where intervention should be realized in cities. At long term we aimed to understand the structural factors involved in vector-borne diseases emergence, such as urbanisation, increased international/regional/urban mobility and unequal governance of diseases. This collaborative project, involving geographers, mathematicians, entomologists and viologists, is a strong example of collaborative and trans-disciplinary research between academics and public health planners.

Through this project, the second objective of this workshop is to present the Geospatial tools developed between CPR and CNRS, that gather innovative data at large scale on the Indian environment (mobility, climatic, socio-economical data). This Geographic Information System has the ambition to serve an extended community of researchers and health planners in India and abroad.

Date: February 9, 2018
Time: 05:30 P.M.

Venue:
Centre for Social Sciences and Humanities,
2 Adbul Kalam Road,
New Delhi–110016 (INDIA)

Note:
Due to embassy requirements, reservation mentioning your full name has to be sent at: telle.olivier@gmail.com.

Location:

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

6 February 2018: Artificial Intelligence, Society, and Politics of the Future

Anupam Guha

Abstract:
At the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, this time centred around artificial intelligence there is both great peril and great hope. Great peril because currently demonstrated technology, if there are no radical socio-economic changes, will kill a significant percentage of Indian jobs and create precarity for the hundreds of millions of India’s workers, both formal and informal, from farmers to engineers. Great hope because the same technology could create a quantum leap in productivity and logistics enabling the potential formation of a radical national policy which could perhaps, if backed with political imagination and wisdom, lead to an emancipation of Indian labour. This fork in the road cannot be avoided.

There are reactionaries who will not look at AI critically and such a political dismissal of a titanic force will render us vulnerable, and there are also neoliberal technocrats who are enamoured with solutionism and who ignore the structural changes needed to make prosperity under AI possible. My talk will focus on, in the Indian context, the potentials of current AI, the need for a critical politically-educated look at it, the need for a radical rethink, beyond band-aid measures like UBI and robot taxes, towards the structural issues of work, wage, property, and public prosperity, and the possible futures of AI. In describing the above, my talk will also lay out the framework for a new kind of politics for the same.

Discussant:
Smriti Parsheera, NIPFP

Date: February 6, 2018
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation at latha.balasubramanian@nipfp.org.in

Location:

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Monday, January 29, 2018

1 February 2018: Panel Discussion on 'The role of the transport sector in Delhi’s air quality: key drivers and opportunities for intervention'

Panellists:
Amit Bhatt, WRI India
Parthaa Bosu, Environment Defence Fund and
Sumit Sharma, Earth Science and Climate Change, TERI

Moderator:
Mukta Naik, Centre for Policy Research

Abstract:
Vehicular pollution has been a significant contributor to Delhi’s air pollution, accounting for up to a fourth of PM 2.5 emissions. Delhi has the largest vehicular population of any city in India, with over a crore registered vehicles. More than 90% of these are private vehicles, and this number has steadily grown over the years. However, regulatory interventions towards promoting cleaner fuel and phasing out old vehicles, as well as legal measures to cap or decrease the number of vehicles have primarily focused on public transit vehicles. The panel will deliberate on key technical and policy drivers for reduction and management of emissions from the transport sector, including the source composition of air pollution from transport, potential gains from changes in fuel standards and fuel types, and issues related to public transport and modal shares.

Date: February 1, 2018
Time: 04:00 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

Note:
Please do RSVP at climate.initiative.cpr@gmail.com

Location:

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30 January 2018: Investment Opportunities and Economic Outcomes: Who Benefits from College and the Stock Market?

Urvi Neelakantan
Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, U.S.A.

Organised by:
Brookings India

Abstract:
Two investments stand out for their power to improve economic outcomes: higher education and stocks. In the absence public funding, though, both are seen as the preserve of the wealthy. As a result, higher education in particular is, in many countries, heavily subsidized with the explicit aim of promoting equality of opportunity. An important point, however, is that differences in learning ability, preparedness, and wealth are likely to affect individuals’ capacity to take advantage of investment opportunities and improve their economic well-being. This seminar will examine and present the effect of access to college and the stock market on individual earnings, wealth, and mobility. Does the power of college to increase well-being exceed that of stocks, as large subsidies to the former suggest?

Date: January 30, 2018
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Kamalnayan Bajaj Auditorium
Brookings India
No. 6, Second Floor,
Dr. Jose P. Rizal Marg,
Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021

Note:
Please RSVP psharma@brookingsindia.org and contact nmehta@brookingsindia.org for media inquiries.

Location:

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

26 February 2018: Indian Migration in Global History

Sunil Amrith
Harvard University

Abstract:
Over the past 200 years, tens of millions of people have left India’s shores to make their living on every continent. Until recently, their experiences have been missing from our accounts of both Indian history and global history. This lecture will show how multiple Indian diasporas have been a cultural, economic, and political force in the making of the modern world.

Date: February 26, 2018
Time: 06:30 P.M.

Venue:
Lecture Room II,
India International Centre (Annexe)
Max Mueller Marg,
New Delhi - 110003(INDIA)

Note:
Please RSVP to president.cpr@cprindia.org

Location: